MOT

Master of Occupational Therapy

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Occupational therapists help build and restore people's routines, so they can continue to forge a prosperous future.

Within the MOT program at Tennessee Wesleyan, you will gain the knowledge and skills to transform lives and make a significant impact in the day-to-day lives of individuals contending with a physical, developmental, social, or emotional challenge.

 

Program Description

The Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) program at Tennessee Wesleyan University provides students with a high quality, enjoyable program which prepares them for a rewarding career in Occupational Therapy.

 

The engaging and career-focused MOT Program includes rigorous coursework that centers on the theory, research, evidence-based practice and ethics of the occupational therapy profession.

 

Undergraduate students looking to attend the Master of Occupational Therapy program can complete an undergraduate degree at TWU in exercise science with a concentration in pre-occupational therapy.

 

Occupational Therapy Certification

The MOT program is designed to help you become a well-rounded, leadership-focused, advocacy-minded occupational therapy practitioner and to succeed at passing the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy Examination.

 

By participating and successfully completing the occupational therapy program curriculum, you will be fully equipped to meet your clients’ diverse occupational needs and serve individuals, families, and communities across a wide array of contexts and settings.

 

An entry-level master or doctorate degree is required to become eligible to sit for the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy Examination, which is required for state licensure to practice. 

 

To apply, students complete the graduate application at TWU, with the required documents submitted through OTCAS, The Centralized Application Service for Occupational Therapy.


Degree Requirements

Conferred Bachelor’s Degree (from an accredited institution of higher education)

Course Requirements

Biology (3.0 credits)
Anatomy & Physiology I & II (8.0 credits)
Kinesiology (3.0 credits)
Epidemiology (3.0 credits)
Developmental Psychology (3.0 credits)
Abnormal Psychology (3.0 credits)
Introductory Sociology (3.0 credits) OR Introductory Anthropology (3.0)
Medical Terminology (3.0 credits)
Statistics (3.0 credits)
There are no advanced placement, credit for experiential learning or work experience requirements at this time. Transfer of previously completed OT-related coursework or credit into the MOT program are not accepted at this time.

GPA Requirement

3.0 or better (Overall GPA)

Testing Requirements

Graduate Record Examinations (GRE)
Tennessee Wesleyan's code is 4219.

Volunteer Hours

40 documented hours in OT or related field

Letters of Recommendation

3 Letters of Recommendation submitted to OTCAS

Background

No Felony or substantial criminal background as per State Licensure Requirements; Signed Affidavit

The MOT program is located near downtown Knoxville in the Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center.

Address:  2001 Laurel Avenue, Suite N-604, Knoxville, TN 37916

While touring the MOT campus, visitors will be able to view the main classroom as well as various labs and OT equipment our students use. Visitors will also tour the Student Research and Resource Area where students can study and conduct research, practice lectures, or simply relax after a test. Furthermore, visitors will be shown the surrounding area of the campus, which includes two hospitals, Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center and East Tennessee Children’s Hospital. Please note that due to COVID-19 precautions, touring inside the hospitals will be limited. We look forward to seeing you, and are excited to have you explore the MOT campus with us!

Contact Aaron Van Landingham by email or call 865-444-3518 to set up your tour.

Our Mission

The Master of Occupational Therapy program at Tennessee Wesleyan University seeks for its students the highest quality and most enjoyable educational experience with the spirit of the liberal arts and within the framework of the Judeo-Christian tradition.

In keeping with the OT program’s themes: Service & Spirituality, Creativity, Innovation, Leadership, Lifelong Learning & Scholarship, it will produce well-prepared and highly sought-after graduates that will continuously add value to the profession of occupational therapy while serving their clients’ and community’s needs.

 

Program Vision

The Master of Occupational Therapy program at Tennessee Wesleyan University will be recognized as an exemplary model occupational therapy program, housed within a comprehensive church-related institution centered in faith and reason that inspires and prepares students to become servant leaders for all people, populations, and communities through effective solutions as presented by the American Occupational Therapy Association’s Vision Statement.

 

Core Values

Tennessee Wesleyan University values a student-centered, engaging learning environment that meets the highest ethical and academic standards. Below are the Values we have prioritized at this time:

 

Inquiry

We value the pursuit of knowledge and strive to develop an enduring passion for learning in others.

Community

We are a community of learners who are united in a common mission to provide a transformational education for our students.

Diversity

We value all peoples and their diverse ways of learning, living and worshiping.

Excellence

We set high standards for scholarship, service, and leadership.

Engagement

We value opportunities that allow our students to apply learning outside the classroom through internships, service learning, study abroad programs, and research.

Sustainability

We value the planet and the preservation of it.

Service

We value our commitment to improving the conditions of others.

The entry-level occupational therapy master’s degree program has applied for accreditation and has been granted Candidacy Status by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 200, North Bethesda, MD 20852-4929. ACOTE’s telephone number c/o AOTA is (301) 652-AOTA and its Web address is www.acoteonline.org. The program must have a preaccreditation review, complete an on-site evaluation, and be granted Accreditation Status before its graduates will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapist administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). In addition, all states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. Note that a felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure. Additionally, all students must complete the graduation requirements of the program and complete 24 weeks of Level-II fieldwork within 12 months following completion of the didactic portion of the program.

Tuition: $675 per credit hour

Total Credit hours = 76

Total Cost of Tuition: $51,300 (in-state and out-of-state)

Total Cost per Semester (6 semesters): $8,550

Fees: $325 per semester (fees subject to change)

Estimated Total Cost of Books: $3,250; avg/semester $542*

Estimated Total Cost of Housing/Room & Board: N/A

*Depends on sources of purchase and format, subject to change

Program Graduates: The first graduating class will occur in spring 2021.

NBCOT Pass Rates

Students must meet the following requirements in order to receive the Master of Occupational Therapy degree.
1. A TWU Intent to Graduate form must be submitted at the beginning of the MOT program
2. Completion of 76 credit hours in the MOT program
3. Cumulative GPA in the TWU MOT program of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale
4. No more than two course grades of C
5. Completion of the master’s thesis
6. Completion of competency package
7. Completion of two Level-II fieldwork rotations
8. Completion of the NBCOT and state licensure applications
9. Completion of all program requirements no later than 3 years from the start of the program; or 1.5 times the length of the program.

Dr. Robert J. Mullaney
Program Director & Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy
Dr. Mullaney is an occupational therapist with more than 18 years of experience ranging from practice in clinical and non-clinical settings to private practice to higher education teaching and management. He has a passion for teaching students who desire to become occupational therapists and who will later help people recover from limited functionality. Dr. Mullaney has led departments of faculty and been a part of teams that created new OT programs extending the reach of OT education and practitioners. He has taught students in Florida, California, Kentucky, Tennessee, and in Study Abroad format in Ireland and England. Dr. Mullaney completed his Doctorate of Occupational Therapy at Eastern Kentucky University and his Doctorate of Business Administration at Nova Southeastern University. He loves the outdoors, art, exercising, traveling, his wife Nicole, son Bobby, 6 dogs, 1 chicken, and his bearded dragon, Elle.
Email: rmullaney@tnwesleyan.edu

Dr. Roderick Morgan
Academic Fieldwork Coordinator & Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy
Dr. Morgan has 31 years of experience in areas ranging from in-home health, skilled nursing facility, school systems, early intervention, inpatient and outpatient facilities. He has a passion for seeing people in their own homes, where he believes the most productive rehabilitation takes place. After his three decades of service, Dr. Morgan decided to take his knowledge to the academic arena, to facilitate younger, competent practitioners who will have the same passion for Occupational Therapy.
Email: rmorgan@tnwesleyan.edu

Dr. Rebecca Ahlfeld
Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy
Dr. Ahlfeld is an occupational therapist and a physical therapist. She graduated from the University of Saint Augustine for the Health Sciences with an MOT degree in 2006 and a DPT degree in 2007. Dr. Ahlfeld has 13 years of clinical experience and has been a clinical instructor for numerous fieldwork students. As a clinical instructor, she developed a passion for instructing students on how to apply their occupational therapy knowledge into practice. While new to the academic arena, Dr. Ahlfeld wants her students to excel as they pursue a career as occupational therapists.
Dr. Ahlfeld is married to her husband, Hank. They have a beautiful daughter, Emma, and a fun-loving dog, Olive. In her free time, Dr. Ahlfeld can be found spending time with family. She enjoys traveling and exploring new places with them.
Email: rahlfeld@tnwesleyan.edu

Ms. Adrianne B. Whitelaw
Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy
Ms. Whitelaw specializes in upper quadrant rehabilitation, which includes more than 4,000 hours of upper quadrant specific treatment and study. She has treated clients across the lifespan and in a variety of settings in her 18-year career as an occupational therapist. She enjoys helping others reach their best outcomes to enable achievement of their personal goals. Ms. Whitelaw is married with three kids, a 10-year-old son and two daughters, 10 and 9. Email: awhitelaw@tnwesleyan.edu

Dr. Stacey Cunningham
Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy
Dr. Cunningham practiced occupational therapy after obtaining her Master of Health Science in Occupational Therapy from the Medical College of Georgia. She returned to academia to teach while obtaining her Ph.D. in Social Policy and Social Research from Loma Linda University. Dr. Cunningham’s clinical experiences have included outpatient rehabilitation within neurology, pediatrics, and feeding, as well as school-based practice and one of her favorite treatment tools, hippotherapy, or occupational therapy utilizing equine movement. Dr. Cunningham has found a passion within the classroom and enjoys journeying with graduate students as they aspire to become quality occupational therapists. She values creative arts; travel; hiking; running; reading; quality time with family, friends, her adopted greyhound; and contemplating God's grace. Email: scunningham@tnwesleyan.edu

Helen Bohan
Adjunct Pediatric Occupational Therapist
Helen grew up in Vacherie, Louisiana and studied OT at LSUMC in New Orleans. She is married to Ed Bohan and they have a daughter, Heather. Helen loves the joy of working with children. She has supervised many OT students in her 28 years as an OT and is looking forward to teaching pediatrics-related courses to the first MOT students at Tennessee Wesleyan University. Email: hbohan@tnwesleyan.edu

Mr. Stedmon Hopkins
Adjunct Professor/Occupational Therapist
Mr. Hopkins received his Master of Occupational Therapy at Eastern Kentucky University, where he is currently pursuing his Doctorate of Occupational Therapy. His areas of expertise are Assistive Technology, Geriatrics, and Community-Based Occupational Therapy. He enjoys preparing students for a life of leadership and integrity in the field of OT. Mr. Hopkins lives in Knoxville with his wife and two children. Email: shopkins@tnwesleyan.edu

Mr. Aaron VanLandingham
Administrative Assistant
Aaron is an alum of Hiawassee College, where he graduated Magna Cum Laude. He is happy to be in a place that is focused and driven toward both student interaction and student success. When not in the office, he volunteers at his church, collects and builds model kits of all shapes and sizes, and gets lost in the newest fantasy novel series. Email: avanlandingham@tnwesleyan.edu

OT 506 PRACTICE IN OT I: INTRODUCTION & HISTORY (3) This course is designed to provide students with in-depth knowledge of the history, theoretical, and philosophical base of occupational therapy. Students will learn about and verify knowledge about key official documents that guide OT practice, roles and responsibilities of an occupational therapist, and ethical dispute resolution strategies. Prerequisite: Acceptance to MOT Program.

OT 501 ACTIVITY - TASK ANALYSIS AND USE OF SELF (3) In this course students will be trained to deeply analyze occupations, activities, and tasks using previously gained knowledge related to anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, psychology, and other program prerequisite courses. The OT Practice Framework: Domain and Process document, and other official guiding documents, will be studied as students demonstrate knowledge and skills required for therapeutic use of self, client screening and assessment, and intervention planning. Students will study concepts related to professional judgement, safety, risk-awareness, ergonomics, environmental modification, and teaching and learning strategies. Prerequisite: Acceptance to MOT Program.

OT 504 OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE & OCCUPATION-BASED PRACTICE (3) This course will enlighten students to occupational science and occupation-based practice. Various aspects of the domains and processes used in occupational therapy intervention, including but not limited to, meaningful occupations, self-care, physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral, and sensory functions will be viewed from a client-centered, occupational performance-based approach. Students will gain skills in assessing, grading, adapting, modifying, and educating clients for purposeful and meaningful participation in daily life occupations. Students will report on the importance of life balance, health, wellness, and the prevention of disease and dysfunction using evidence-based practice resources. Prerequisite: Acceptance to MOT Program.

OT 505 CRAFTS, MEDIA, AND GROUP DYNAMICS IN OT LAB (2) With consideration of previously gained knowledge and use of evidence-based  resources, students will gain skills and knowledge in appropriately determining therapeutic activities using crafts, media, and group and individual therapy interventions to promote health, wellness, function, and participation in daily life activities. Various documentation requirements and rules, regulations, and guidelines will be explored. Students will practice needs assessments, justification of services, clinical reasoning, and communication of rationale for intervention plans while delivering OT services. Prerequisite: Acceptance to MOT Program.

OT 502 LIFEPSAN SERIES I: PEDIATRIC AND SCHOOL-BASED OT (2) This course is the first set of three in the Lifespan Series of courses. Students will gain knowledge and review skill and technique requirements of pediatric and schoolbased occupational therapy practice. In this course, students will explore evidencebased assessment and evaluation tools, documentation requirements, reimbursement systems and mechanisms, inter and intra-professional collaboration, and practice skills in educating clients and related parties. Students will demonstrate knowledge of typical and atypical development of children less than 1-year-old through 18 years old and will focus on aspects of occupations related to development, remediation, and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral, and sensory skills and deficits. Prerequisite: Acceptance to MOT Program.

OT 503 LIFESPAN SERIES I: PEDIATRIC & SCHOOL-BASED OT LAB (1) This hands-on lab course is the first of three in the Lifespan Series of courses. Students will demonstrate learned skill and technique requirements of pediatric and school-based occupational therapy practice. In this course, students will utilize evidence-based assessment and evaluation tools, develop intervention plans, simulate the delivery of treatments, practice documentation requirements that are reflective of various reimbursement systems and mechanisms, incorporate inter and intra-professional collaboration, and practice skills in educating clients and related parties. Students will demonstrate knowledge of typical and atypical development of children less than 1-year-old through 18 years old and will focus on aspects of occupations related to development, remediation, and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral, and sensory skills and deficits. Prerequisite: Acceptance to MOT Program. Co-requisite: OT 502.

OT 601 ADVOCACY & LEADERSHIP IN OT PRACTICE (2) This course will emphasize advocacy and leadership in the occupational therapy profession. Students will learn of the importance of advocating for those who are considered vulnerable, at risk, or who have experienced occupational injustice, deprivation of needed services, social hardships, and overall welfare difficulties in various contexts. Policy review, strategies for change, and opportunities for leadership for OTs span over social, economic, political, geographic, and demographic factors that impact OT practice. OT models of practice and frames of reference will be used to assess traditional and emerging practice areas for OTs and consider the roles of health promotion, prevention of disease and dysfunction, care coordination, case management, transition services, fieldwork, and more. Management and collaboration of OT and related healthcare services will be discussed. Prerequisites: All first semester MOT Program courses.

OT 611 ADVOCACY INITIATIVES (1) This course will emphasize advocacy initiatives and leadership roles that can be taken within and outside of the profession of occupational therapy at the local, state, and national levels. Opportunities will be explored in various settings, such as in healthcare, private practice, community-based, school, higher education, work, and various professional associations. Students will use knowledge gained in this course to become an active participant and advocate of occupational therapy services in one of the roles explored. Prerequisites: All first semester MOT Program courses.

OT 612 SCHOLARSHIP OF TEACHING & LEARNING (1) This course is an optional course and if selected, must be taken with OT 611. In this course, students will have the opportunity to take a deeper dive and gain a greater understanding into the pedagogical practices in occupational therapy. Students will incorporate their knowledge of OT pedagogical practices by developing an educational session for presentation to peers which specifically identifies and critiques teaching and learning practices selected. Prerequisite: All first semester MOT Program coursework. Co-requisite: OT 611.

OT 602 LIFESPAN SERIES II: WORKING-AGED ADULTS & COACHING IN OT (2) This course is the second set of three in the Lifespan Series of courses. Students will gain knowledge and review skill and technique requirements of workingaged adults and coaching in occupational therapy practice. In this course, students will explore evidence-based assessment and evaluation tools, documentation requirements, reimbursement systems and mechanisms, inter and intra-professional collaboration, and practice skills in educating clients and related parties. Students will demonstrate knowledge of typical development and the impacts of disease and dysfunction on working-aged adults and will focus on aspects of occupations related to development, remediation, and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral, and sensory skills and deficits. Prerequisites: All first semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 603.

OT 603 LIFESPAN SERIES II: WORKING-AGED ADULTS & COACHING IN OT LAB (1) This course is in the second set of three in the Lifespan Series of courses. Students will apply knowledge, skill, and technique requirements of working-aged adults and coaching in occupational therapy practice. Students will explore and practice evidence-based assessment and evaluation tools, documentation requirements, reimbursement systems and mechanisms, inter and intra-professional collaboration, and practice skills in educating clients and related parties. Students will demonstrate knowledge of typical development and the impacts of disease and dysfunction on working-aged adults and will focus on aspects of occupations related to development, remediation, and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral, and sensory skills and deficits. Prerequisites: All first semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 602

OT 610 UNIVERSAL DESIGN, ACCESSIBILITY, AND ERGONOMICS (3) Students will communicate key concepts, study, demonstrate, and practice exercises related to various facets of occupational therapy having to do with the design, fabrication, application, fitting, and training in assistive technologies and devices to enhance occupational performance and foster participation and well-being. Students will gain and use knowledge of universal design and ergonomics concepts, study accessibility guidelines, the Americans with Disabilities Act and related documents, and make propositions for their use in client care. Prerequisites: All first semester MOT Program courses.

OT 604 TECHNOLOGIES OF OT (2) Students will further incorporate co-requisite knowledge gained in the areas of universal design, accessibility, and ergonomics while assessing and performing task analyses for the need for additional assistive technologies to ensure optimal function in all domain areas as per the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework, 3rd edition. Students will create intervention plans based on assessments and task analyses and review payment options, documentation requirements, training and education requirements, and indications and contraindications for use. Prerequisites: All first semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 605.

OT 605 TECHNOLOGIES OF OT LAB (1) Students will incorporate co-requisite knowledge gained in the areas of universal design, accessibility, and ergonomics while assessing and performing task analyses for the need for additional assistive technologies to ensure optimal function in all domain areas as per the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework, 3rd edition. Students will follow through with intervention plans based on assessments and task analyses and review payment options, practice documentation requirements, provide training and education to mock-clients and related parties. Prerequisites: All first semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 604

OT 606 PRACTICE IN OT II: EVALUATION, ASSESSMENT, AND INTERVENTION (3) This course takes an in-depth look and comparison of a wide variety of evaluation and assessment tools used in OT practice across the lifespan for a variety of settings. It links evaluation and assessment results with intervention planning and implementation within the domains of OT practice. Students will report on their comparisons of various evaluation and assessment tools and discuss how practice strategies within the intervention plan are used to therapeutically benefit client performance and participation in life tasks. Prerequisites: All first semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 607.

OT 607 PRACTICE IN OT II LAB: EVALUATION, ASSESSMENT, AND INTERVENTION (2) This course takes an in-depth look and comparison of a wide variety of evaluation and assessment tools used in OT practice across the lifespan for a variety of settings. It links evaluation and assessment results with intervention planning and implementation within the domains of OT practice. Students will practice evaluation and assessment administration using various evaluation and assessment tools and discuss and demonstrate specific practice strategies within their developed intervention plans for the therapeutic benefit of their clients as related to performance and participation in life tasks. Prerequisites: All first semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 606.

OT 702 LIFESPAN SERIES III: OLDER ADULT & GERIATRIC OT (2) This course is the third of the set of three in the Lifespan Series of courses. Students will gain knowledge and review skill and technique requirements for working with older adults and geriatric clients in occupational therapy practice. In this course, students will explore evidence-based assessment and evaluation tools, documentation requirements, reimbursement systems and mechanisms, inter and intra-professional collaboration, and practice skills in educating clients and related parties. Students will demonstrate knowledge of typical development and the impacts of disease and dysfunction on older adults and geriatric clients and will focus on aspects of occupations related to remediation, and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral, and sensory skills and deficits. Prerequisites: All first and second semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 703.

OT 703 LIFESPAN SERIES III: OLDER ADULT & GERIATRIC OT LAB (1) This course is the third of the set of three in the Lifespan Series of courses. Students will apply knowledge, skill, and technique requirements when working with older adults and geriatric clients in occupational therapy practice. Students will explore and practice evidence-based assessment and evaluation tools, documentation requirements, reimbursement systems and mechanisms, inter and intra-professional collaboration, and practice skills in educating clients and related parties. Students will demonstrate knowledge of typical development and the impacts of disease and dysfunction on older adults and geriatric clients and will focus on aspects of occupations related to remediation and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral, and sensory skills and deficits. Prerequisites: All first and second semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 702.

OT 706 PRACTICE IN OT III: OT CONTEXT & SERVICE DELIVERY (3) This course is the third in the Practice in OT Series of courses and concentrates of occupational therapy contexts and environments and OT service delivery. Students will explore the differences between traditional and emerging practice settings, gain skills in modalities used in the various settings, identify benefits, pros and cons, and indications and contraindications for use of modalities most common in various settings, and provide educational presentations to those seeking or receiving OT services. Students will also learn of the various guiding principles, rules, laws, and/ or regulations governing use of modalities and OT services in various settings and at the local, state, and national levels. Prerequisites: All first and second semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 707.

OT 707 PRACTICE IN OT III LAB: OT CONTEXT & SERVICE DELIVERY LAB (1) This course is the third of three in the Practice in OT Series of courses and concentrates on occupational therapy contexts and environments and OT service delivery. Students will explore the differences between traditional and emerging practice settings, practice skills in modalities used in the various settings, identify benefits, pros and cons, and indications and contraindications for use of modalities most common in various settings, and provide educational presentations to those seeking or receiving OT services. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the various guiding principles, rules, laws, and/or regulations governing use of modalities and OT services in various settings and at the local, state, and national levels. Prerequisites: All first and second semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 706.

OT 708 MENTAL HEALTH & PSYCHOSOCIAL OT I: TRADITIONAL PRACTICE SETTINGS (3) This course is designed to explore the mental health and psychosocial components of traditional practice settings in which occupational therapy practitioners’ work. Students will analyze various traditional practice settings across the life span and identify appropriate evaluation and assessment tools, treatment planning, treatment implementation, documentation and reimbursement requirements, legal aspects and obligations, and more. Prerequisites: All first and second semester MOT program coursework. Co-requisites: OT 709.

OT 709 MENTAL HEALTH & PSYCHOSOCIAL OT I LAB + LEVEL I FW EXPERIENCE: TRADITIONAL PRACTICE SETTINGS (2) This course is designed to further explore the mental health and psychosocial components of traditional practice settings in which occupational therapy practitioners’ work. Students will analyze and practice, within various traditional practice settings across the life span, the identification of the need for OT services and the evaluation and intervention of clients. Under the supervision of MOT Program Faculty, students will practice skills with appropriate evaluation and assessment tools, treatment planning, treatment implementation, documentation as per facility and reimbursement requirements, and various other aspects of OT services. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the legal aspects and obligations of working with various clients across the lifespan with a focus on the mental and psychosocial health components. Students will interact with real clients under the supervision of MOT Program Faculty to practice their patient/client-practitioner interaction and therapeutic use-of-self skills. This course meets one of the two Level-I Fieldwork Hours Requirements of the MOT Program. Prerequisites: All first and second semester MOT program coursework. Co-requisites: OT 708.

OT 801 MODALITIES & UPPER EXTREMITIES (2) This course is designed to deeply analyze the concepts of occupational therapy related to common upper body deformities, trauma, and injuries requiring surgeries or immobilization. Rehabilitation indications, with a review of commonly used surgical techniques, will be reviewed to build the base of knowledge needed to evaluate, assess, and treatment plan for the design, fabrication, application, fitting, and training for assistive technologies and devices used to enhance occupational performance in daily life tasks. Deep-thermal, electrotherapeutic, and other preparatory modalities will be reviewed. Students will provide educational sessions/presentation on proper techniques, indications, contraindications, safety and risk awareness and more. Prerequisites: All first, second, and third semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 802.

OT 802 MODALITIES & UPPER EXTREMITIES LAB (1) This course is designed to provide basic competency and practice opportunities to students on the concepts of occupational therapy related to common upper body deformities, trauma, and injuries requiring surgeries or immobilization. Rehabilitation indications, with demonstrated knowledge of commonly used surgical techniques, will be used to evaluate, assess, and create treatment plan for the design, fabrication, application, fitting, and training for assistive technologies and devices used to enhance occupational performance in daily life tasks. Deep-thermal, electrotherapeutic, and other preparatory modalities will be practiced. Students will provide evaluations and assessments, treatment planning, and treatment implementation utilizing demonstrated proper techniques and knowledge of indications, contraindications, safety and risk awareness, and more. Prerequisites: All first, second, and third semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 801.

OT 803 SCIENCE-DRIVEN OT PRACTICE (2) This course is the first of the formal research-related courses of the MOT Program. On a broad scale, students will practice and explore the various aspects of locating, critiquing, and determining the quality of evidence and research, including organizing, collecting, and analyzing data for use in the OT evaluation and the overall delivery of OT services process. Students will practice utilizing scholarly literature to make evidence-based decisions and evaluate techniques of research, such as use of descriptive, correlational, and inferential quantitative statistics and coding, analyzing, and synthesizing qualitative data. Students will critique the validity of research and the various methodologies used as they present argument presentations on various OT related topics of interest. Prerequisites: All first, second, and third semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 804 OT

804 RESEARCH & LEADERSHIP IN OT PRACTICE I: MASTER’S THESIS PLAN (3) This course is the first of two Master’s Thesis Courses of the MOT Program. In this course, students will create a Master’s Thesis Plan while practicing and exploring the various aspects of locating, critiquing, and determining the quality of evidence and research, including organizing, collecting, and analyzing data for use in the OT evaluation and the overall delivery of OT services process. Leadership in healthcare concepts in occupational therapy practice will be linked to quality evidence-based research and practice. Students will practice utilizing scholarly literature to make evidence-based decisions and evaluate techniques of research, such as use of descriptive, correlational, and inferential quantitative statistics and coding, analyzing, and synthesizing qualitative data. Students will critique the validity of research and the various methodologies used as they prepare their topic of interest Master’s Thesis Research Plan. Prerequisites: All first, second, and third semester MOT Program courses. Co-requisite: OT 803.

OT 805 LEVEL II FIELDWORK EXPERIENCE ORIENTATION SEMINAR (2) Students will learn of all processes related to the Fieldwork portion of the MOT program, including necessary paperwork, facility-specific orientations and paperwork, background checks, drug screens, policies and procedures, ethics, laws and rules, and more. Students will receive and work through the MOT Fieldwork Manual and practice completing paperwork and case scenarios related to the various sites they will be attending for Fieldwork. All components of the OTPF, 3rd edition, will be reviewed as it relates to Fieldwork. Prerequisites: All first, second, and third semester MOT Program courses.

OT 808 MENTAL HEALTH & PSYCHOSOCIAL OT II: COMMUNITY & EMERGING PRACTICE AREAS (3) This course is designed to explore the mental health and psychosocial components of community and emerging practice settings in which occupational therapy practitioners’ work. Students will analyze various community and emerging practice settings across the life span and identify appropriate evaluation and assessment tools, treatment planning, treatment implementation, documentation and reimbursement requirements, legal aspects and obligations, and more. Students will compare and contrast differences between traditional and community and emerging practice settings. Prerequisites: All first, second, and third semester MOT program coursework. Co-requisites: OT 809.

OT 809 MENTAL HEALTH & PSYCHOSOCIAL OT II LAB + LEVEL I FW EXPERIENCE: COMMUNITY & EMERGING PRACTICE AREAS (2) This course is designed to further explore the mental health and psychosocial components of community and emerging practice settings in which occupational therapy practitioners’ work. Students will analyze and practice, within various community and emerging practice settings across the life span, the identification of the need for OT services and the evaluation and intervention of clients. Under the supervision of MOT Program Faculty, students will practice skills with appropriate evaluation and assessment tools, treatment planning, treatment implementation, documentation as per facility and reimbursement requirements, and various other aspects of OT services. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the legal aspects and obligations of working with various clients across the lifespan with a focus on the mental and psychosocial health components. Students will interact with live clients under the supervision of MOT Program Faculty to practice their patient/ client-practitioner interaction and therapeutic use-of-self skills. This course meets the second of the two Level-I Fieldwork Hours Requirements of the MOT Program. Prerequisites: All first, second, and third semester MOT program coursework. Corequisites: OT 808.

OT 814 RESEARCH IN OT PRACTICE II: MASTER’S THESIS COMPLETION & PRESENTATION (2) This course is the second of two Master’s Thesis Courses of the MOT Program. In this course, students will refine, complete, and formally present their Master’s Thesis. Students will reflect on how they have explored the various aspects of locating, critiquing, and determining the quality of evidence and research, including organizing, collecting, and analyzing data for use in the OT evaluation and the overall delivery of OT services process. They will demonstrate how their Master’s Thesis topic of interest captured and incorporated concepts of leadership in healthcare and in occupational therapy practice. Students will present how their research has built upon and was based on high quality, evidence-based research findings and sound therapy practices. Students will explain their processes and use of scholarly literature to make evidence-based decisions and evaluate techniques of research, such as use of descriptive, correlational, and inferential quantitative statistics and coding, analyzing, and synthesizing qualitative data. Students will explain how they have critiqued the validity of research and the various methodologies used as they prepared their topic of interest Master’s Thesis Research Plan and implementation. Students will coordinate with their Master’s Thesis Advisor all final and required paperwork for submission and presentation of their Master’s Thesis. Prerequisites: All first, second, third, and fourth semester MOT Program courses.

OT 896 LEVEL II FIELDWORK EXPERIENCE ROTATION I (6) Students entering their first Level II Fieldwork (FW) Rotation will have successfully completed all previous didactic coursework from semesters 1-4. During Level II FW, students will reflect upon and utilize the skills, techniques, knowledge, clinical reasoning, and critical thinking skills. They will apply their knowledge of frames of references of OT practice, occupation-based practice, client-centered practice appropriate for the setting and developmental level of clients. Students will demonstrate sound clinical judgement, safety and risk awareness, and therapeutic use of self under the supervision of an experienced and licensed occupational therapist. Overall, students will demonstrate most, if not all skills expected of a pre-entry level occupational therapist. Students will complete 12 full-time weeks of Level II FW and receive, at minimum, a midterm and final evaluation using the Level II Fieldwork Performance Evaluation approved and provided by the American Occupational Therapy Association. Prerequisites: All previous didactic coursework (i.e., first, second, third, and fourth semester coursework). Co-Requisites: Two of the following on-line courses: OT 816, OT 817, OT 818, OT 812, or OT 820.

OT 816 SPIRITUALITY IN OT PRACTICE (1) Students will choose two 1.0 credit on-line courses to take while completing the first 12-week FW rotation. Students are provided with the opportunity to choose special topics of interest so that they may interject their on-line course topics into their Level II FW experiences, regardless of setting or stage of life clients exist in. Spirituality in OT Practice enables students to take a deeper look into the role of OT regarding addressing spirituality or spirituality-related concerns of clients. As spirituality is a domain of OT, as per the OTPF, 3rd edition, students will analyze their FW setting through the lens of spirituality and OTs role in it. Students are to incorporate the learnings from this course into their final FW In-Service Project, as assigned by their Fieldwork Educator. Prerequisites: All previous MOT Program didactic coursework (i.e., first, second, third, and fourth semester courses). Co-Requisite: OT 896.

OT 817 CREATIVITY IN OT PRACTICE (1) Students will choose two 1.0 credit on-line courses to take while completing the first 12-week FW rotation. Students are provided with the opportunity to choose special topics of interest so that they may interject their on-line course topics into their Level II FW experiences, regardless of setting or stage of life clients exist in. Creativity in OT Practice enables students to take a deeper look into the role of OT regarding being creative while resolving daily life concerns of clients. Students will analyze their FW setting through the lens of creativity and OTs role in it. Students are to incorporate the learnings from this course into their final FW In-Service Project, as assigned by their Fieldwork Educator. Prerequisites: All previous MOT Program didactic coursework (i.e., first, second, third, and fourth semester courses). Co-Requisite: OT 896.

OT 818 MANAGING CHANGE IN OT PRACTICE (1) Students will choose two 1.0 credit on-line courses to take while completing the first 12-week FW rotation. Students are provided with the opportunity to choose special topics of interest so that they may interject their on-line course topics into their Level II FW experiences, regardless of setting or stage of life clients exist in. Managing Change in OT Practice enables students to take a deeper look into the role of OT regarding environments of constant change while resolving daily life concerns of clients. Students will analyze their FW setting through the lens of change management and OTs role in it. Students are to incorporate the learnings from this course into their final FW In-Service Project, as assigned by their Fieldwork Educator. Prerequisites: All previous MOT Program didactic coursework (i.e., first, second, third, and fourth semester courses). Co-Requisite: OT 896.

OT 812 SEXUALITY IN OT PRACTICE (1) Students will choose two 1.0 credit on-line courses to take while completing the first 12-week FW rotation. Students are provided with the opportunity to choose special topics of interest so that they may interject their on-line course topics into their Level II FW experiences, regardless of setting or stage of life clients exist in. Sexuality in OT Practice enables students to take a deeper look into the role of OT regarding sexuality or related issues while resolving daily life concerns of clients. Students will analyze their FW setting through the lens of sexuality and OTs role in it. Students are to incorporate the learnings from this course into their final FW InService Project, as assigned by their Fieldwork Educator. Prerequisites: All previous MOT Program didactic coursework (i.e., first, second, third, and fourth semester courses). Co-Requisite: OT 896.

OT 820 OT WELLNESS SEMINAR (1) Students will choose two 1.0 credit on-line courses to take while completing the first 12-week FW rotation. Students are provided with the opportunity to choose special topics of interest so that they may interject their on-line course topics into their Level II FW experiences, regardless of setting or stage of life clients exist in. The OT Wellness Seminar enables students to take a deeper look into the role of OT regarding overall health and wellness while resolving daily life concerns of clients. Students will analyze their FW setting through the lens of wellness and OTs role in it. Students are to incorporate the learnings from this course into their final FW InService Project, as assigned by their Fieldwork Educator. Prerequisites: All previous MOT Program didactic coursework (i.e., first, second, third, and fourth semester courses). Co-Requisite: OT 896.

OT 897 LEVEL II FIELDWORK EXPERIENCE ROTATION II (6) Students entering their second Level II Fieldwork (FW) Rotation will have successfully completed all previous didactic coursework from semesters 1-5 and their first Level II FW Rotation. During Level II FW, students will reflect upon and utilize the skills, techniques, knowledge, clinical reasoning, and critical thinking skills. They will apply their knowledge of frames of references of OT practice, occupation-based practice, client-centered practice appropriate for the setting and developmental level of clients. Students will demonstrate sound clinical judgement, safety and risk awareness, and therapeutic use of self under the supervision of an experienced and licensed occupational therapist. Overall, students will demonstrate all skills expected of a pre-entry level occupational therapist. Students will complete 12 full-time weeks of Level II FW and receive, at minimum, a midterm and final evaluation using the Level II Fieldwork Performance Evaluation approved and provided by the American Occupational Therapy Association. Prerequisites: All previous didactic coursework (i.e., first, second, third, and fourth semester coursework). Co-Requisites: OT 819 & OT 899.

OT 898 LEVEL II FIELDWORK EXPERIENCE CONTINUATION (1-6) Students missing hours from any of the Level II FW Rotations will have to make up the missing hours by enrolling in and successfully completing this OT 898 course. Students will have successfully completed all previous didactic coursework from semesters 1-5. During Level II FW, students will reflect upon and utilize the skills, techniques, knowledge, clinical reasoning, and critical thinking skills. They will apply their knowledge of frames of references of OT practice, occupation-based practice, client-centered practice appropriate for the setting and developmental level of clients. Students will demonstrate sound clinical judgement, safety and risk awareness, and therapeutic use of self under the supervision of an experienced and licensed occupational therapist. Overall, students will demonstrate all skills expected of a pre-entry level occupational therapist. Students will complete 4 fulltime weeks of Level II FW and receive, at minimum, a midterm and final evaluation using the Fieldwork Performance Evaluation approved and provided by the American Occupational Therapy Association. Prerequisites: All previous didactic coursework (i.e., first, second, third, fourth, and fifth semester coursework). Co-Requisites: Dependent on student situation and what is needed.

OT 815 RESEARCH IN OT PRACTICE CONTINUATION (1-2) This course is the Master’s Thesis continuation course. If students do not satisfactorily complete their Master’s Thesis in the allotted timeframe, they will have to enroll in this course to complete the Master’s Thesis requirement of the MOT Program. In this course, students will refine, complete, and formally present their Master’s Thesis. Students will reflect on how they have explored the various aspects of locating, critiquing, and determining the quality of evidence and research, including organizing, collecting, and analyzing data for use in the OT evaluation and the overall delivery of OT services process. They will demonstrate how their Master’s Thesis topic of interest captured and incorporated concepts of leadership in healthcare and in occupational therapy practice. Students will present how their research has built upon and was based on high quality, evidence-based research findings and sound therapy practices. Students will explain their processes and use of scholarly literature to make evidence-based decisions and evaluate techniques of research, such as use of descriptive, correlational, and inferential quantitative statistics and coding, analyzing, and synthesizing qualitative data. Students will explain how they have critiqued the validity of research and the various methodologies used as they prepared their topic of interest Master’s Thesis Research Plan and implementation. Students will coordinate with their Master’s Thesis Advisor all final and required paperwork for submission and presentation of their Master’s Thesis. Prerequisites: All first, second, third, fourth, and fifth semester MOT Program courses.

OT 819 OT LEADERSHIP AND HEALTHCARE ADMINISTRATION CAPSTONE (2) This course is the Capstone Course of the MOT Program. Students will incorporate all prior knowledge of the didactic and FW portions of the MOT Program and create a career OT Leadership Plan. Within this plan, students will tie in a concept taken from their Master’s Thesis and link it with a career path and/or practice setting of interest. Utilizing demonstrated research skills, students will support their OT Leadership Plan with evidence sufficient to make a positive difference within the profession and community in which they serve as OT practitioners. Prerequisites: All MOT Program courses and FW Rotations. Co-Requisite: OT 899.

OT 899 TRANSITIONING TO OT PRACTICE (1) This is the final course of the MOT Program. Students will have completed all didactic coursework and fieldwork prior to taking this course. In this course, students will prepare for their transition from graduate student to OT practitioner. Students will formally take practice exams for successful passing of the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) OT Examination, complete applications for the Official NBCOT OT Examination and State Licensure, prepare study plans for the NBCOT OT Examination, prepare professional resumes, complete mock/real job interviews, apply for graduation, and demonstrate knowledge of applicable national requirements for credentialing and requirements for licensure, certification, or registration under state laws. Prerequisites: All previous MOT Program didactic coursework and fieldwork rotations. Co-requisites: OT 819.

The TWU MOT Program is currently in Candidacy Status with ACOTE: Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education, American Occupational Therapy Association 6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 200, North Bethesda, MD 20852-4929. Phone: 301-652-6611x2042 www.acoteonline.org.